Lamborghini Jarama Rally

Friday 21 July 2017

The Lamborghini Jarama is 2+2 grand tourer built by Italian car manufacturer Lamborghini between 1970 and 1976. It was designed by Bertone designer Marcello Gandini. Ferruccio Lamborghini was concerned the car would be thought to be named after the Jarama racing circuit near Madrid, while he meant the car to be named for the fighting bulls bred in Jarama river area in Spain.

In 1970, Lamborghini designed the Islero to meet the demand of the American market. Instead of just redesigning the Islero Lamborghini made the Jarama, a mark 2 Islero. Lamborghini made the Jarama with a shorter chassis to meet U.S. standards. The Jarama's chassis was shortened only by 10.7 inches. The Jarama was now built on a shortened version of the same platform as the Espada. Even though the Jarama was heavier than the Islero, it had the same top speed. Two different models were made, the original GT (1970–1973) model having 350 bhp (260 kW) V12, and the GTS (also known as Jarama S) (1972–1976) with its output upped to 365 bhp (272 kW). Also, with the GTS there were a few minor body modifications, redesigned interior dashboard, power assisted steering, removable roof panels, and an automatic transmission became available as options. A total of 328 Jaramas were built.

Ferruccio Lamborghini's personal Jarama GTS is on display at the official Lamborghini museum at the company's factory in Sant'Agata Bolognese, Italy.

It is easy to confuse the Iso Lele and the Lamborghini Jarama as their external design is largely the same, as both were designed by Marcello Gandini.






Technical data:
- engine: V12
- capacity: 3900 cc
- horsepower: 365 HP
- gearbox: 5+1
- top speed: 280 km/h

Lamborghini Urraco Rally

Thursday 20 July 2017

The Lamborghini Urraco is a 2+2 sports car manufactured by Italian automaker Lamborghini. It was introduced at the Turin Auto Show in 1970 but was not put on sale until 1973; production ended in 1979. It was named after a breed of bulls.

The car is a 2+2 coupé with body designed by Marcello Gandini, at the time working for Carrozzeria Bertone. Rather than being another supercar, like the Lamborghini Miura, the Urraco was more affordable, an alternative to the contemporary Ferrari Dino and Maserati Merak.

When production ceased in 1979, 791 Urracos had been built. Twenty-one of these were Urraco P111 (P250 Tipo 111) for the American market. In order to comply with American regulations, these cars had larger front bumpers and emissions controls, the latter resulting in less horsepower for the American version. The other Urraco versions were the Urraco P200, Urraco P250 and Urraco P300 with 2 litre, 2.5 litre, and 3 litre V-8 respectively.

Both the Lamborghini Silhouette, with its detachable roof panel, and its successor Lamborghini Jalpa, with a 3.5 litre V-8 engine, were based upon the Urraco.






Technical data:
- engine: V8
- capacity: 2996 cc
- horsepower: 250 HP
- gearbox: 5+1
- top speed: 260 km/h

Scania V8

Thursday 20 July 2017

This truck used to be very popular all over Europe. I was expecting more comprehensive information on it available in the Internet. Unfortunately I could not find any in English. Please share if you have.




Technical data:
- engine: V8
- capacity: 14000 cc
- horsepower: 350 HP
- gearbox: 10+2
- top speed: 100 km/h

Mercedes Benz SK

Wednesday 19 July 2017

It would seem this truck used to be so popular and there should be no problem finding good summary about it. The trucks of the Mercedes-Benz series Schwere Klasse (SK, for "heavy class") were produced from 1989 through 1998, when they were succeeded by the new Mercedes-Benz Actros truck. The Mercedes Benz SK, in essence is basically a revamped Mercedes-Benz NG chassis with a few added driver comforts and electronic assistance and diagnosis. Therefore, it is a much more comfortable ride than its predecessor.

The SK series is basically a mere evolution of the Neue Generation, which was built up to the year 1989. There were few changes to the cab: radiator grill and wind leading plates were combined optically, and the lower edges of the side windows were made with a progressive incline towards the front. This design feature had already been realized in 1977 with the T1 and in 1984 with the LN series.

In 1994 the SK series, which apart from the upgraded engines was still based on the NG series from 1973, was facelifted for the last time with a new front design.










Technical data:
- engine: V8
- capacity: 16000 cc
- horsepower: 435 HP
- gearbox: 16+2
- top speed: 90 km/h

Buick Riviera 1982

Tuesday 18 July 2017

The Buick Riviera is a personal luxury car produced by Buick from 1963 to 1999. GM's first entry into that prestige niche, the Riviera was highly praised by automotive journalists upon its high-profile debut. While early models stayed close to the original form, subsequent generations varied substantially over the Riviera's thirty-year lifespan. In all, 1,127,261 were produced.

The Riviera name had been used by Buick since the early 1950s for various prestige versions of existing models, with the 1962 iteration being a large six-window hardtop version of the top-of-the-line Electra 225. The crisply styled 1963 E-body design was Buick's first ground-up Riviera model. The Riviera name was resurrected for concept cars displayed at auto shows in 2007 and 2013 in hopes of reintroducing the marque, but no plans to do so are currently in place.
Unlike its contemporary GM E platform stablemates, the Oldsmobile Toronado and Cadillac Eldorado, the Riviera was initially a standard front engine/rear-wheel drive platform, only becoming front wheel drive starting in 1979 as part of a sweeping move in that direction by the American automobile industry.

1979 saw the debut of the first front wheel drive Riviera. Built on a trimmer, 114 in (2,900 mm) wheelbase, it once again shared its mechanical design and platform with the Cadillac Eldorado and Oldsmobile Toronado. The Olds 403 and Buick 350 were dropped, but the Olds 350 remained, as did a new turbocharged Buick V6 of 231 cu in (3.8 L) displacement with 185 hp (138 kW). The Riviera became Motor Trend's Car of the Year. Sales more than doubled, to 52,181 for 1979 and 48,621 for the very similar 1980 models.

1981 saw the Turbo renamed T-Type and the demise of the 350 engine in favor of the Oldsmobile-built 307 cu in (5.0 L) with 140 hp (104 kW) (phased in during the 1980 MY). The standard engine was now Buick's 125 hp (93 kW) 252 cu in (4.1 L) V6, and a new option was an Oldsmobile diesel engine with a mere 105 hp (78 kW). offered through 1985. 1982 also saw the first-ever Riviera convertible, although relatively few were built, owing to very high prices-US$23,944. Riviera convertible was available in only two color choices-white or red firemist with the only interior color of red leather. A turbocharged Riviera convertible was chosen to be the pace car at the 1983 Indianapolis 500, although most convertible Rivieras had the V8 engine, which saw an increase in rated SAE net horse power to 150 for both convertibles and coupes fitted with it from 1982 through the 1985 model year.

Overall sales made the 1980s Riviera a great success, reaching 65,305 for the 1985 model year.








Technical data:
- engine: V8
- capacity: 7000 cc
- horsepower: 245 HP
- gearbox: 4+1
- top speed: 170 km/h

Buick Riviera 1970

Tuesday 18 July 2017

The Buick Riviera is a personal luxury car produced by Buick from 1963 to 1999. GM's first entry into that prestige niche, the Riviera was highly praised by automotive journalists upon its high-profile debut. While early models stayed close to the original form, subsequent generations varied substantially over the Riviera's thirty-year lifespan. In all, 1,127,261 were produced.

The Riviera name had been used by Buick since the early 1950s for various prestige versions of existing models, with the 1962 iteration being a large six-window hardtop version of the top-of-the-line Electra 225. The crisply styled 1963 E-body design was Buick's first ground-up Riviera model. The Riviera name was resurrected for concept cars displayed at auto shows in 2007 and 2013 in hopes of reintroducing the marque, but no plans to do so are currently in place.
Unlike its contemporary GM E platform stablemates, the Oldsmobile Toronado and Cadillac Eldorado, the Riviera was initially a standard front engine/rear-wheel drive platform, only becoming front wheel drive starting in 1979 as part of a sweeping move in that direction by the American automobile industry.

The Riviera was redesigned for the 1966 model year. It retained its cruciform X-frame, powertrain, and brakes, but it wore a longer, wider, more curvaceous body that modernized the "sweepspear" inspired beltline introduced in the previous generation. This generation shared its platform with the Oldsmobile Toronado, and, a year later, with the Cadillac Eldorado. A notable styling point was the absence of vent windows, a feature GM had introduced with a flourish in the 1930s. Headlamps remained concealed, but they now pivoted up above the grille when not in use. Unlike the Toronado and Eldorado, the Riviera retained a conventional rear wheel drive layout. It was now some 200 pounds (91 kg) heavier, so acceleration with the unchanged 425 engine was slightly slower. The Gran Sport package remained available as an option. Rear seat belts and AM/FM radio were optional.

Inside, the four-place cabin with front and rear bucket seats and center console was replaced by a choice of bucket seats or conventional bench seats as standard equipment, making the Riviera a full six-passenger car for the first time. Optionally available was a Strato-bench seat with armrest or Strato bucket seats with either a short consolette or a full-length operating console with a "horseshoe" shaped floor shifter and storage compartment. Both the buckets and Strato-bench seat were available with a reclining seat option for the passenger's side. Sales for 1966 rebounded to 45,308, a new record.

The most significant change for 1967 was the adoption of Buick's entirely new V8 of 430 cu in (7.0 L) displacement, 360 horsepower (270 kW) and 475 lb·ft (644 N·m) of torque to replace the old 425 "nailhead". The new engine, with greater power and torque on hand, represented a significant performance improvement. Gasoline mileage improved slightly with the new engine, though it remained gas-thirsty compared to modern cars. Powerful disc brakes with Bendix four-piston calipers became optional for the front wheels but most Riviera continued to be ordered with Buick's aluminum brake drums which were almost as good. Cosmetically, changes were few, and were limited to the addition of a wide, full-width, center-mounted horizontal chrome grille bar that stretched over the headlight doors and outboard parking lights. Sales eased to 42,799 for the 1967 model year. The Riviera had full instrumentation.

1967 saw the introduction of U.S. mandated safety equipment to improve occupant protection during a crash, including an energy-absorbing steering column, non-protruding control knobs, 4-way hazard flasher, soft interior surfaces, locking seat backs (on 2-door models), a dual-circuit hydraulic braking system (with warning light), and shoulder belt anchors. The Rivieras complied on all counts and featured the full range of safety features.

1968 models had reshaped front and rear loop-type bumpers that encased the vehicle's (recessed crosshatch) grille and tail lamps, respectively. Hidden wiper arms were also new. Federally mandated side marker lights were of an inverted trapezoidal shape on the lower leading edges of the front fenders. Rear marker lights were circular. The interior was restyled and, unlike the 1966–67 models, shared its instrument panel with the other full-size Buick models. Shoulder belts for front outboard occupants were made standard on all cars built from January 1, 1968. There were very few mechanical changes in 1968, but the transmission lost its variable pitch torque converter. A tilt steering wheel was standard. Sales set another new record in 1968, as 49,284 units were sold.

For 1969, minor styling changes took place. Grilles changed from the crosshatch pattern seen in 1968 to a pattern of finely spaced, slim vertical bars overlaid by two wider horizontal bars, which jutted forward at their inboard edges. Front marker lights became far shorter, and square in shape. Inside, front outboard passengers received new headrests. The ignition switch was moved from the instrument panel to the steering column, and it now locked the steering wheel and selector lever when the key was removed (a security feature which became mandatory for the 1970 model year). Chrome side trim was revised, as well. At the rear, the reverse lights were move from the rear bumper into the 1969 Riviera's new three-section tail-light lenses. Sales for 1969 improved again, to 52,872. A new front suspension system was used.

The 1970 Riviera was restyled. Exposed quad headlamps were nearly flush-mounted, while the new front bumper wrapped around and over the new vertical bar grille, set between the headlamp pods. A newly optional side trim feature accented the large coupe's flowing lines. Skirted rear wheels became standard, with exposed wheels an option. At the rear, a new rear bumper/taillight motif was seen. The engine was upgraded to 455 cu in (7.46 L), the largest engine Buick offered to date, rated at 370 horsepower (280 kW) gross, 245 hp (183 kW) net, and over 500 lb·ft (680 N·m) of torque. Despite the fact that 1970 sales dropped to 37,366, the second-generation Riviera proved more successful than the first, with 227,669 units sold over five seasons.







Technical data:
- engine: V8
- capacity: 7000 cc
- horsepower: 245 HP
- gearbox: 4+1
- top speed: 170 km/h

Plymouth Barracuda

Monday 17 July 2017
The Plymouth Barracuda is a two-door car that was manufactured by Plymouth from the 1964 to 1974 model years.
The first-generation Barracuda, a fastback A-body coupe based on the Plymouth Valiant, had distinctive wraparound back glass and was available from 1964 to 1966.
The second-generation 1967 to 1969 Barracuda, though still Valiant-based, was heavily redesigned. Second-generation A-body cars were available in fastback, hardtop, and convertible versions.
The third-generation 1970 to 1974 E-body Barracuda, no longer Valiant-based, was available as a coupe and a convertible, both of which were very different from the previous models. The final model year for the Barracuda was 1974.
The redesign for the 1970 Barracuda removed all its previous commonality with the Valiant. The original fastback design was deleted from the line and the Barracuda now consisted of coupe and convertible models. The all-new model, styled by John E. Herlitz, was built on a shorter, wider version of Chrysler's existing B platform, called the E-body. Sharing this platform was the newly launched Dodge Challenger; however no exterior sheet metal interchanged between the two cars, and the Challenger, at 110 inches (2,800 mm), had a wheelbase that was 2 inches (51 mm) longer than the Barracuda.
The E-body Barracuda was now "able to shake the stigma of 'economy car'." Three versions were offered for 1970 and 1971: the base Barracuda (BH), the luxury oriented Gran Coupe (BP), and the sport model 'Cuda (BS). Beginning mid year 1970, and ending with the 1971 model, there also was the Barracuda Coupe (A93), a low-end model which included the 198ci Slant Six as a base engine, lower grade interior, and (like other Coupe series Chrysler Corp. offered that year) had fixed quarter glass instead of roll-down rear passenger windows. The high-performance models were marketed as 'Cuda deriving from the 1969 option. The E-body's engine bay was larger than that of the previous A-body, facilitating the release of Chrysler's 426 cu in (7.0 L) Hemi for the regular retail market.
For 1970 and 1971, the Barracuda and Barracuda Gran Coupe had two six-cylinder engines available — a new 198 cu in (3.2 L) version of the slant-6, and the 225 — as well as three different V8s: the 318ci, the 383ci with two-barrel carburetor and single exhaust, and the 383ci with four-barrel carburetor and dual exhaust 330 hp (250 kW) SAE gross. The Cuda had the 383ci 335 hp (250 kW) SAE gross (same as Dodge's 383 Magnum) as the standard engine. It also had the 440ci four-barrel Super Commando, the 440ci six-barrel Super Commando Six Pak, and the 426ci Hemi. The 440- and Hemi-equipped cars received upgraded suspension components and structural reinforcements to help transfer the power to the road.






Technical data:
- engine: V8
- capacity: 6980 cc
- horsepower: 425 HP
- gearbox: 4+1
- top speed: 230 km/h

Peugeot 404

Monday 17 July 2017
The Peugeot 404 is a large family car produced by French automobile manufacturer Peugeot from 1960 to 1975, with the exception of the truck which was sold until 1988. It was also made under licence in various African countries until 1991 (in Kenya). Designed by Pininfarina, the 404 was offered initially as a sedan, estate, and pickup. A convertible was added in 1962, and a coupé in 1963. The 404 was fitted with a 1.6 L petrol engine, with either a Solex carburetor or Kugelfischer mechanical fuel injection or a 1.9 L diesel engine available as options. Introduced at the Paris Motor Show as an option was the inclusion of a 3-speed ZF automatic transmission, similar to the unit already offered on certain BMW models, as an alternative to the standard column-mounted manual unit. Popular as a taxicab, the 404 enjoyed a reputation for durability and value. Peugeot's French production run of 1,847,568 404s ended in 1975. Still relatively common in developing nations (especially in pickup form), an additional 2,885,374 units were produced under license until 1988.






Technical data:
- engine: 4 cylinders
- capacity: 1618 cc
- horsepower: 68 HP
- gearbox: 4+1
- top speed: 145 km/h