Ford Ranchero GT

Friday 22 March 2019
The Ford Ranchero is a coupe utility that was produced by Ford between 1957 and 1979. Unlike a pickup truck, the Ranchero was adapted from a two-door station wagon platform that integrated the cab and cargo bed into the body. A total of 508,355 units were produced during the model's production run. Over its lifespan it was variously derived from full-sized, compact, and intermediate automobiles sold by Ford for the North American market.
During the 1970s, the Ranchero name was used in the South African market on a rebadged Australian Ford Falcon utility. These vehicles were sent to South Africa in complete knock down (CKD) form, and assembled at the Port Elizabeth plant. In Argentina, a utility version of the locally produced Ford Falcon was also called Ranchero.
The original Ranchero sold well enough to spawn a competitor from General Motors in 1959, the Chevrolet El Camino.
The first Ford Model T and Model A pickup trucks were created from roadsters by placing a pickup box behind the body of a car. In 1934, Ford Australia's designer Lew Bandt modified a coupe with a smoothly integrated loadbed that could be used like a car to drive to church or to deliver pigs to market. This created the coupe utility which remains a popular body style known as the "ute" in Australia. In North America, pickup trucks evolved into a heavier duty form with cabs and beds that were quite distinct from passenger automobiles. The Ranchero was the first postwar American vehicle of its type adapted from a popular sedan from the factory. It combined the sleek looks of a sedan with the utility of a light-duty pickup truck.
In 1972, a radical change occurred in the Torino and Ranchero lines. The sleek, pointy look of the previous year's model was replaced with a larger, heavier design. Most prominent was a wide semioval grille reminiscent of a jet intake and a new body-on-frame design. Three models were still available; the now-standard 500, the new Squire with simulated woodgrain "paneling" along the flanks, and the sporty GT. Engine choices remained basically the same beginning with the 250 cubic-inch six-cylinder and a selection of V8s that ranged from the standard 302 to Cleveland and Windsor series 351s, plus the new-for-1972 400. The 385-series V8 (the 429 for 1972-73; the 460 for 1974-76) was still available. However, all suffered from lower compression ratios to better meet new emissions standards. The 351 cu in (5.8 L) Cleveland could still be obtained in tuned 4-V Cobra Jet form through 1974. A four-speed manual transmission was available on Cobra Jet-powered GT models.
The 1973 Ranchero had a redesigned front end to meet new federal standards for front impact protection. Aside from slight cosmetic differences, the Ranchero remained basically the same until the Torino's final year, 1976.













Technical data:
- engine: V8
- capacity: 6600 cc
- horsepower: 230 HP
- gearbox: 4+1
- top speed: 170 km/h

Ford Mustang Mustero

Tuesday 20 March 2019
When the Mustang debuted many saw different possibilities for the sporty new Ford. One group created station wagons while these guys built them into trucks.
Perhaps encouraged by the production of the Intermeccania Mustang station wagon, which had been based on an internal Ford design, Beverly Hills Ford (now defunct) secured permission from the Ford Motor Company to build a series of pickup trucks based on the 1965 – 66 Mustang – a relationship similar to what Ford has today with Galpin Ford Autosports and its Fisker Rocket.
A separate company was formed, named Beverly Hills Mustang Limited, located on Alden Drive in Beverly Hills (now the site of a modern granite and glass office building).
The name they decided upon was a blending (portmanteau, to be accurate) of the words Mustang and Ranchero to create Mustero. Not really an appealing name, sounding a bit like a fungus that grows on grape vines.











Technical data:
- engine: 4 cylinders
- capacity: 1290 cc
- horsepower: 62 HP
- gearbox: 4+1
- top speed: 142 km/h

Ford Escort MkI

Tuesday 19 March 2019
The Ford Escort is a small family car which was manufactured by Ford Europe from 1968 to 2004. The Ford Escort name was also applied to several different small cars produced in North America by Ford between 1981 and 2003.
The Mark I Ford Escort was introduced in Ireland and the United Kingdom at the end of 1967, making its show debut at Brussels Motor Show in January 1968. It replaced the successful, long-running Anglia. The car was presented in continental Europe as a product of Ford's European operation. Escort production commenced at the Halewood plant in England during the closing months of 1967, and for left hand drive markets during September 1968 at the Ford plant in Genk. Initially the continental Escorts differed slightly from the UK built ones under the skin. The front suspension and steering gear were differently configured and the brakes were fitted with dual hydraulic circuits; also the wheels fitted on the Genk-built Escorts had wider rims. At the beginning of 1970, continental European production transferred to a new plant on the edge of Saarlouis, West Germany.
The Escort was a commercial success in several parts of western Europe, but nowhere more than in the UK, where the national best seller of the 1960s, BMC's Austin/Morris 1100 was beginning to show its age while Ford's own Cortina had grown, both in dimensions and in price, beyond the market niche at which it had originally been pitched. It also competed with the Vauxhall Viva, and from early 1970 the Rootes Group's Hillman Avenger.
In June 1974, six years into the car's UK introduction, Ford announced the completion of the two millionth Ford Escort, a milestone hitherto unmatched by any Ford model outside the US. It was also stated that 60% of the two million Escorts had been built in Britain. In West Germany cars were built at a slower rate of around 150,000 cars per year, slumping to 78,604 in 1974 which was the last year for the Escort Mark I. Many of the German built Escorts were exported, notably to Benelux and Italy; from the West German domestic market perspective the car was cramped and uncomfortable when compared with the well-established and comparably priced Opel Kadett, and it was technically primitive when set against the successful imported Fiat 128 and Renault 12. Subsequent generations of the Escort made up some of the ground foregone by the original model, but in Europe's largest auto-market the Escort sales volumes always came in well behind those of the General Motors Kadett and its Astra successor.
he Escort had conventional rear-wheel drive and a four-speed manual gearbox, or three-speed automatic transmission. The suspension consisted of MacPherson strut front suspension and a simple live axle mounted on leaf springs. The Escort was the first small Ford to use rack-and-pinion steering. The Mark I featured contemporary styling cues in tune with its time: a subtle Detroit-inspired "Coke bottle" waistline and the "dogbone" shaped front grille – arguably the car's main stylistic feature. Similar Coke bottle styling featured in the larger Cortina Mark III (a visually similar car was built in West Germany as the Taunus) launched in 1970.
Initially, the Escort was sold as a two-door saloon (with circular front headlights and rubber flooring on the "De Luxe" model). The "Super" model featured rectangular headlights, carpets, a cigar lighter and a water temperature gauge. A two-door estate was introduced at the end of March 1968 which, with the back seat folded down, provided a 40% increase in maximum load space over the old Anglia 105E estate, according to the manufacturer. The estate featured the same engine options as the saloon, but it also included a larger, 7 1⁄2-inch-diameter (190 mm) clutch, stiffer rear springs and in most configurations slightly larger brake drums or discs than the saloon. A panel van appeared in April 1968 and the 4-door saloon (a bodystyle the Anglia was never available in for UK market) in 1969.
Underneath the bonnet was the Kent Crossflow engine also used in the smallest capacity North American Ford Pinto. Diesel engines on small family cars were rare, and the Escort was no exception, initially featuring only petrol engines – in 1.1 L, and 1.3 L versions. A 940 cc engine was also available in some export markets such as Italy and France. This tiny engine remained popular in Italy, where it was carried over for the Escort Mark II, but in France it was discontinued during 1972.
There was a 1300GT performance version, with a tuned 1.3 L Crossflow (OHV) engine with a Weber carburetor and uprated suspension. This version featured additional instrumentation with a tachometer, battery charge indicator, and oil pressure gauge. The same tuned 1.3 L engine was also used in a variation sold as the Escort Sport, that used the flared front wings from the AVO range of cars, but featured trim from the more basic models. Later, an "executive" version of the Escort was produced known as the "1300E". This featured the same 13" road wheels and flared wings of the Sport, but was trimmed in an upmarket, for that time, fashion with wood trim on the dashboard and door cappings.
A higher performance version for rallies and racing was available, the Escort Twin Cam, built for Group 2 international rallying. It had an engine with a Lotus-made eight-valve twin camshaft head fitted to the 1.5 L non-crossflow block, which had a bigger bore than usual to give a capacity of 1,558 cc. This engine had originally been developed for the Lotus Elan. Production of the Twin Cam, which was originally produced at Halewood, was phased out as the Cosworth-engined RS1600 (RS denoting Rallye Sport) production began. The most famous edition of the Twin Cam was raced on behalf of Ford by Alan Mann Racing in the British Saloon Car Championship in 1968 and 1969, sporting a full Formula 2 Ford FVC 16-valve engine producing over 200 hp. The Escort, driven by Australian driver Frank Gardner went on to comfortably win the 1968 championship.
The Mark I Escorts became successful as a rally car, and they eventually went on to become one of the most successful rally cars of all time. The Ford works team was practically unbeatable in the late 1960s / early 1970s, and arguably the Escort's greatest victory was in the 1970 London to Mexico World Cup Rally, driven by Finnish legend Hannu Mikkola and Swedish co-driver Gunnar Palm. This gave rise to the Escort Mexico (1598cc "crossflow"-engined) special edition road versions in honour of the rally car. Introduced in November 1970, 10,352 Mexico Mark Is were built using bodyshells using additional strengthening panels in high stress areas making them more suitable for competition.
In addition to the Mexico, the RS1600 was developed with 1,601 cc Cosworth BDA which used a Crossflow block with a 16-valve Cosworth cylinder head, named for "Belt Drive A Series". Both the Mexico and RS1600 were built at Ford's Advanced Vehicle Operations (AVO) facility located at the Aveley Plant in South Essex. As well as higher performance engines and sports suspension, like the Mexico these models featured the strengthened bodyshell.
After updating the factory team cars with a larger 1701 cc Cosworth BDB engine in 1972 and then with fuel injected BDC, Ford also produced an RS2000 model as an alternative to the somewhat temperamental RS1600, featuring a 2.0 L Pinto (OHC) engine. This also clocked up some rally and racing victories; and pre-empted the hot hatch market as a desirable but affordable performance road car. Like the Mexico and RS1600, this car was produced at the Aveley plant using the strengthened bodyshell.
The Escort was built in Germany and Britain, as well as in Australia and New Zealand.









Technical data:
- engine: 4 cylinders
- capacity: 1558 cc
- horsepower: 140 HP
- gearbox: 4+1
- top speed: 180 km/h

Ford Bronco

Monday 19 March 2019
he Ford Bronco is a model line of SUVs that were manufactured and marketed by Ford from 1965 to 1996. After the first generation of the Bronco was introduced as a competitor to compact SUVs (including the Jeep CJ-5 and International Harvester Scout), the succeeding four generations of the Bronco were full-size SUVs, competing against the Chevrolet K5 Blazer and Dodge Ramcharger. The first Bronco was assembled using its own chassis, while the full-size Bronco was derived from the Ford F-Series (F-100, later F-150) pickup truck; all Broncos were produced with four-wheel drive powertrains.
The Ford Bronco was withdrawn from the Ford light-truck model line following declining demand for two-door SUVs. For the 1997 model year, Ford replaced the Bronco with the Ford Expedition, a four-door SUV based on the F-150 (the later Ford Excursion was based on the Ford F-250 Super Duty).
From 1965 to 1996, Broncos were produced at Ford's Michigan Truck Plant in Wayne, Michigan. In 2017, Ford announced the reintroduction of the Ford Bronco as a mid-size SUV (derived from the Ford Ranger) as a 2021 model; manufacturing is to return to Michigan Assembly.
For the 1978 model year, the second-generation Bronco was introduced; to better compete with the Chevrolet K5 Blazer, Dodge Ramcharger, and Jeep Cherokee, the Bronco entered the full-size SUV segment. In place of a model-specific chassis, the Bronco was adapted directly from the Ford F-Series, becoming a shortened version of the F-100 4x4. Originally intended for a 1974 launch, the second-generation Bronco (named "Project Shorthorn" during its development) was postponed to MY 1978 in response to fuel economy concerns related to the 1973 fuel crisis; the second-generation Bronco was released for sale after development was nearly finalized on its MY 1980 successor.
In a notable break from a period of downsizing in the American automotive industry, the second-generation Bronco grew significantly in size, adding 12 inches of wheelbase, approximately 28 inches of length, 11 inches of width, and 4 inches of height; based on powertrain configuration, the Bronco gained 1,100 to 1,600 pounds of curb weight over its predecessor.
The second-generation Bronco marks the introduction of design commonality with the Ford F-Series and retained the lift-off hardtop bodystyle for the three-door wagon, though now fiberglass over the rear seat area only (and not a full length steel top), continued through the 1996 withdrawal of the model line. In spite of its short production cycle (only two years), the second-generation Bronco proved successful, overtaking the Blazer and Ramcharger in sales for the first time; initial demand was so strong that customers waited several months to receive vehicles from dealers.













Technical data:
- engine: V8
- capacity: 5600 cc
- horsepower: 158 HP
- gearbox: 3+1
- top speed: 140 km/h

DAF 2600

Monday 18 March 2019
The DAF 2600 series, introduced as "The mother of international road transport", astounded the European trucking fraternity with its compact design for maximum load length and its modern cab design. Cab designer W van den Brink had managed to create a standard sleeper cab within an overal length of 1.8 meters, and it set a new standard in driver comfort.
At a stroke, the spectacular DAF 2600 alleviated all the shortcomings of the 2000 DO, and the new truck ensured DAF's position as the market leader in driver comfort for many years to come. The trucking industry had never before seen such a well-appointed - if not luxuriously trimmed - cab, which gave a crew of two ample space and amenities for a comfortable overnight stop.
The 2600's cab was such a radical departure from the norm that it became the bench mark other manufacturers set out to emulate. Initially launched with Leyland DP680 diesels rated at 220bhp, the 2600 was to enjoy a production run of 11 years during which time substantially more powerful engine options would become available. The 2600 was destined to become a volume seller for DAF, and it helped the company achieve a major milestone in 1964, with the delivery of DAF's 50,000th truck chassis.
DAF to support its increasing sales into the international haulage sector further variations on the flagship 2600 theme were introduced in 1967, with trailing axle (AS) 6x2 and double-drive (AT) 6x4 configurations being launched. In addition the heavy end of the DAF product range was futher enhanced, in 1968, with the introduction of a new series of DAF-developed 11.6-litre naturally aspirated engines, known as the K-series. The DK 1160 produced 230 bhp SAE, whilst the DKA 1160 made ingenious use of tuned-length induction ram-pipes to boost the peak output to 250 bhp. Both were naturally aspirated engines.













Technical data:
- engine: V8
- capacity: 11600 cc
- horsepower: 230 HP
- gearbox: 4+2
- top speed: 90 km/h

Chevrolet Opala SS 4C

Sunday 17 March 2019
Chevrolet Opala was a Brazilian executive car sold under the Chevrolet brand in South America from 1969 to 1992, by General Motors do Brasil. It was derived from the German Opel Rekord Series C, Opel Commodore Series A, but used USA-sourced engines and a local design styling. Two four-cylinder engines: the Chevrolet 153ci 4-cylinder from Chevy II/Nova, which later got a new crankshaft stroke and cylinder bore, changing its size to 151ci (usually mistaken for the Pontiac Iron Duke engine), and the six-cylinder 250 from the contemporary line of North American car/light truck production. GM manufactured about one million units including the Opala sedan, Opala Coupé, and the station wagon variant, the Opala Caravan. It was replaced by the Chevrolet Omega in 1992, also an Opel spinoff. It was the first passenger car built by GM in Brazil by the General Motors do Brasil division. A luxury version of the Opala was marketed as the Chevrolet Diplomata.
It was used by the Brazilian Federal Police for many years. The military government issued Opalas to its agents through the 1970s. Its reliability and easy maintenance made the Opala the choice of many taxi drivers and was also popular on racetracks.
The Opala's long-lived 250-cubic-inch (4.1 L) engine was also used in its replacement, the Chevrolet Omega (which featured electronic fuel injection in the GLS and CD trims) from 1995 to 1998. Some of the Opalas components and chassis were used in other Brazilian cars such as the Santa Matilde, Puma GTB, and the Fera XK (a Jaguar XK replica). Leva pau de corsa 1.0.
Founded in January 1925, General Motors do Brasil originally only assembled, and later, manufactured, light trucks and utilities until the mid-1960s, when they decided to produce their first Brazilian-made passenger car.
The options varied between the traditional, large, more expensive American-style cars that GM was already selling in the United States line, such as the Impala, and the lighter and more economical models from German GM-subsidiary Opel (such as the Kadett, Olympia, Rekord and Commodore) which were already imported to Brazil in small quantities. After wavering between the small Kadett and the somewhat larger Rekord/Commodore line, GMB opted for the latter, but later introduced the Kadett as well.
On November 23, 1966, in a Press Conference at the Club Atlético Paulistano in São Paulo, GM publicly announced the existence of "Project 676", which would become the Chevrolet Opala.
In the fall of 1970, a more luxurious version was added called Comodoro, reflecting Europe's Opel Commodore. The Comodoro-4 received a somewhat more powerful version of the 2.5 liter four cylinder engine in some model years, with 88 PS (65 kW; 87 hp) rather than 80 PS (59 kW; 79 hp). The same engine was used in the Opala SS-4. Even more luxurious was the Diplomata, which was released in November 1979.
Under the hood, which hinged forwards, in the European style, the Opala originally offered only two engine choices: a 153 cu in (2,507 cc) straight-four and a 230 cu in (3,764 cc) straight-six. These engine were of traditional design for the era, with cast iron cylinder block and head, and overhead valves, actuated by pushrods and a camshaft mounted in the block, and pressed-steel rocker arms, whose spherical fulcrum was GM's proprietary design. Fuel was fed from either single or double-barrel carburetors. In 1973 the four cylinder was replaced by Pontiac's 151 cu in (2,474 cc) "Iron Duke" engine, of generally similar configuration The 3.8 had already been replaced by the bigger 4.1 (4,093 cc or 250 cu in) in 1971.
The engines used in the Opala had been already used for years in the USA: the 153ci had emerged in the 1962 Chevrolet Nova, becoming the first inline four in a Chevrolet since 1928, and the 230ci appeared in the 1963 Impala. The 151 cu in Pontiac Iron Duke was also found in AMC's Jeeps and Eagles, and was known for its versatility and toughness. Known for its reliability, the 153ci was an industry benchmark until the 1980s. The straight-six later served as a stationary engine, a school bus engine, and even found its way into forklifts.
The 6-cylinder engine crankshaft had seven main bearings (five in four-cylinders) and the generous (if not redundant) size of its inner moving parts attributed to its durability and exceptional smoothness. The hydraulic valve lifters made for easy maintenance.
The straight-six's biggest limitation through the years was poor distribution of air-fuel mixture to the cylinders due to a sub-optimal intake manifold design. Cylinders one and six (on the ends of the engine), received the lowest ratio, with a higher percentage of air in the mixture, while the central ones tended to get a richer mixture, unbalancing the engine's stoichiometric efficiency. Basically, in order to ensure the outer cylinders received a high enough air/fuel ratio to avoid detonation, the carburetor had to be set to run overly rich, which wasted fuel). This design flaw could easily be solved by installing a race intake manifold that sported two or three two-barrel carburetors, as in stock car racing. Only in 1994, with the arrival of multipoint injection in the Omega, was the engine's problem finally solved.
The performance of Opala 3.8L was actually quite pleasing; with a top speed of 112.5 mph (181.1 km/h) and acceleration from 0 to 60 mph (97 km/h) in about 11 seconds, it was the fastest Brazilian car of its time, losing the title the following year to the Dodge Dart whose 318ci V8 had more power and torque. The two 2.5L fours did not offer as much vigor, but had enough torque enough for everyday use. The main complaint with the four-cylinder engines was their roughness - so rough that GM employees of the time called the engine "little Toyota", in allusion to the diesel engine installed in the locally built Toyota Bandeirante.
Both the Especial and Luxo had a manual gearbox, rear wheel drive, front independent suspension and rear live axle, both with coil springs. In front, the suspension components were anchored to one side, set in the unibody with screws, later known as the subframe. The tires were the first tubeless tires used on a car manufactured in Brazil. It had a diaphragmatic (or "Chinese hat") clutch spring, which was becoming popular throughout the world. The Opala SS, originally only available with the "250" engine, was the first version to receive a four-speed manual gearbox. This was coupled with a tachometer and lots of matte black striping.













Technical data:
- engine: V4
- capacity: 4100 cc
- horsepower: 169 HP
- gearbox: 4+1
- top speed: 190 km/h

Chevrolet Monte Carlo

Saturday 16 March 2019
The Chevrolet Monte Carlo is a two-door coupe manufactured and marketed by Chevrolet from 1970 to 2007 model years (non-continuously), encompassing six generations. Chevrolet marketed the Monte Carlo as a personal luxury car, with the last generation classified as a full-sized coupé. The first four generations of the Monte Carlo (1970–72, 1973–77, 1978–80, and 1981–88) were of a rear-wheel-drive, V8-powered (a V6 engine from 1978) coupe design, utilizing body-on-frame construction. The later rear-wheel-drive generations did not incorporate the trend of uni-body construction that became more prevalent in the early 1980s as automakers downsized their vehicle lines to satisfy increasing demand for fuel-economy after the 1973 oil crisis and the early 1980s recession. The SS model was reintroduced from mid-1983 to 1988 with a 305 cu in (5.0 L) V8.
The car was named for the city Monte Carlo in the Principality of Monaco, specifically the ward of Monte Carlo/Spélugues. After the discontinuation of the rear-drive Monte Carlo after 1988, the nameplate was revived in 1995 for the fifth-generation, a front-drive, V6-powered coupe based on the Chevrolet Lumina sedan. The sixth and final-generation Monte Carlo in 2000 was built alongside the Chevrolet Impala, which succeeded the Lumina as Chevrolet's mid-sized sedan. The Monte Carlo SS was revived from 2000 to 2007, that was initially powered by 3.8 L V6 (supercharged in 2004 and 2005) and by a 5.3 L V8 for 2006 and 2007.
he body was restyled with the other GM mid-size formal coupes (Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme, Pontiac Grand Prix, Buick Regal). It featured a smoother profile than the previous models and new vertical taillights similar to the 1973–1977 models. Engine offerings were carried over, including the standard 229 CID Chevrolet V6 (231 CID Buick V6 in California) an optional 267 CID V8 (not available in California), a 305 CID V8 in the base and Landau models, and a turbocharged 170 hp (130 kW) 231 CID Buick V6 in the Monte Carlo Turbo. There were a total of 3,027 Monte Carlo Turbos for 1981. The Monte Carlo Turbo appeared slightly different from other Monte Carlos that year because in addition to the turbo motor it also was equipped with a small hood scoop on the left side of the hood. It also had Turbo 3.8 badges with Chevrolet bowtie on the sides of the hood scoop, on the trunk lid, and on the right side of the dash. An automatic transmission, power steering and power front disc brakes were standard equipment. While this car was considered by some to be much better looking (and appeared more aerodynamic) than its Buick Regal, Pontiac Grand Prix, and Olds Cutlass cousins, only one team tried to make a go of it in NASCAR cup racing. While the big Monte Carlo was the dominant body style in the late 1970s, winning 30 or so races, the downsized (and cleaned-up) 1981 body would only take two checkered flags in the 1981 and 1982 seasons when it was run. Few revisions were made on the 1982 Monte Carlo. All engines, except for the turbocharged 231 CID V6, which was discontinued along with the Monte Carlo Turbo model, were carried over from 1981. New for 1982 were the additions of a 260 CID V6 and an Oldsmobile 350 CID V8, both of which were diesel engines. With the introduction of GM's new mid-size platform that saw the introduction of the Buick Century, Chevrolet Celebrity, Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera and Pontiac 6000, the chassis designations were shuffled up. The new mid-size cars were designated as A-body cars, whereas the cars previously designated as A-bodies were now called G-bodies. A black exterior was not offered in 1982 and also not available in 1982 for the first time in Monte Carlo history was a sportier interior option with Strato bucket seats and console, as only the standard notchback bench or optional 55/45 bench were offered this year. Weight distribution was 57% in the front and 43% in the rear.
Receiving only minor updates, the 1983 model year Monte Carlo gained a revised grille and interior trim patterns. The standard engine continued to be the 229 in3 V6, and the 165 hp 305 in3 V8 was optional. The Super Sport Package, Z65 was once again made an option in 1983. The Monte Carlo SS was reintroduced in 1983, following twelve years of being discontinued. The Monte Carlo SS featured European body color-coding, a new front fascia, a rear spoiler and a V8. The 1984 year model coupe production totaled 112,730 with an additional 24,050 had the SS option (with an 180 hp (130 kW) 305 V8 that saw a 5 hp (3.7 kW) boost from the previous year). The Monte Carlo SS was available with Strato bucket seats and floor console as extra-cost options for the first time in place of the standard split bench seat with armrest (the Strato buckets also returned as an option on the regular Monte after a two-year absence). The regular Monte Carlo came standard with a 125 hp (93 kW) 229 CID V6 (231 CID V6 for California) and a 165 hp (123 kW) 305 V8 was optional. Available for the last year in a base Monte Carlo was the 350 CID diesel engine, and there were only 168 manufactured. All engines for 1984 got the three-speed automatic transmission with the exception of three SSs at the end of the 1984 production run that received the Turbo Hydramatic 200-4R transmission with overdrive. In 1984, there were a limited number of Monte Carlo SSs made in Mexico, for Mexican sale. The differences are many compared to US/Canadian SSs. There was no rear spoiler. The rims were 14" checker style, an option on the base Monte Carlos in the US. The side mirrors are a different style and black. The interior is from a Grand Prix and is blue in color. The engine was a 350 CID V8, and the transmission was a 4-speed manual with a Hurst shifter.











Technical data:
- engine: V8
- capacity: 5000 cc
- horsepower: 170 HP
- gearbox: 4+1
- top speed: 170 km/h

Chevrolet Diplomata Caravan

Saturday 16 March 2019
Chevrolet Opala was a Brazilian executive car sold under the Chevrolet brand in South America from 1969 to 1992, by General Motors do Brasil. It was derived from the German Opel Rekord Series C, Opel Commodore Series A, but used USA-sourced engines and a local design styling. Two four-cylinder engines: the Chevrolet 153ci 4-cylinder from Chevy II/Nova, which later got a new crankshaft stroke and cylinder bore, changing its size to 151ci (usually mistaken for the Pontiac Iron Duke engine), and the six-cylinder 250 from the contemporary line of North American car/light truck production. GM manufactured about one million units including the Opala sedan, Opala Coupé, and the station wagon variant, the Opala Caravan. It was replaced by the Chevrolet Omega in 1992, also an Opel spinoff. It was the first passenger car built by GM in Brazil by the General Motors do Brasil division. A luxury version of the Opala was marketed as the Chevrolet Diplomata.
It was used by the Brazilian Federal Police for many years. The military government issued Opalas to its agents through the 1970s. Its reliability and easy maintenance made the Opala the choice of many taxi drivers and was also popular on racetracks.
The Opala's long-lived 250-cubic-inch (4.1 L) engine was also used in its replacement, the Chevrolet Omega (which featured electronic fuel injection in the GLS and CD trims) from 1995 to 1998. Some of the Opalas components and chassis were used in other Brazilian cars such as the Santa Matilde, Puma GTB, and the Fera XK (a Jaguar XK replica). Leva pau de corsa 1.0.
Founded in January 1925, General Motors do Brasil originally only assembled, and later, manufactured, light trucks and utilities until the mid-1960s, when they decided to produce their first Brazilian-made passenger car.
The options varied between the traditional, large, more expensive American-style cars that GM was already selling in the United States line, such as the Impala, and the lighter and more economical models from German GM-subsidiary Opel (such as the Kadett, Olympia, Rekord and Commodore) which were already imported to Brazil in small quantities. After wavering between the small Kadett and the somewhat larger Rekord/Commodore line, GMB opted for the latter, but later introduced the Kadett as well.
On November 23, 1966, in a Press Conference at the Club Atlético Paulistano in São Paulo, GM publicly announced the existence of "Project 676", which would become the Chevrolet Opala.
In the fall of 1970, a more luxurious version was added called Comodoro, reflecting Europe's Opel Commodore. The Comodoro-4 received a somewhat more powerful version of the 2.5 liter four cylinder engine in some model years, with 88 PS (65 kW; 87 hp) rather than 80 PS (59 kW; 79 hp). The same engine was used in the Opala SS-4. Even more luxurious was the Diplomata, which was released in November 1979.
Under the hood, which hinged forwards, in the European style, the Opala originally offered only two engine choices: a 153 cu in (2,507 cc) straight-four and a 230 cu in (3,764 cc) straight-six. These engine were of traditional design for the era, with cast iron cylinder block and head, and overhead valves, actuated by pushrods and a camshaft mounted in the block, and pressed-steel rocker arms, whose spherical fulcrum was GM's proprietary design. Fuel was fed from either single or double-barrel carburetors. In 1973 the four cylinder was replaced by Pontiac's 151 cu in (2,474 cc) "Iron Duke" engine, of generally similar configuration The 3.8 had already been replaced by the bigger 4.1 (4,093 cc or 250 cu in) in 1971.
The engines used in the Opala had been already used for years in the USA: the 153ci had emerged in the 1962 Chevrolet Nova, becoming the first inline four in a Chevrolet since 1928, and the 230ci appeared in the 1963 Impala. The 151 cu in Pontiac Iron Duke was also found in AMC's Jeeps and Eagles, and was known for its versatility and toughness. Known for its reliability, the 153ci was an industry benchmark until the 1980s. The straight-six later served as a stationary engine, a school bus engine, and even found its way into forklifts.
The 6-cylinder engine crankshaft had seven main bearings (five in four-cylinders) and the generous (if not redundant) size of its inner moving parts attributed to its durability and exceptional smoothness. The hydraulic valve lifters made for easy maintenance.
The straight-six's biggest limitation through the years was poor distribution of air-fuel mixture to the cylinders due to a sub-optimal intake manifold design. Cylinders one and six (on the ends of the engine), received the lowest ratio, with a higher percentage of air in the mixture, while the central ones tended to get a richer mixture, unbalancing the engine's stoichiometric efficiency. Basically, in order to ensure the outer cylinders received a high enough air/fuel ratio to avoid detonation, the carburetor had to be set to run overly rich, which wasted fuel). This design flaw could easily be solved by installing a race intake manifold that sported two or three two-barrel carburetors, as in stock car racing. Only in 1994, with the arrival of multipoint injection in the Omega, was the engine's problem finally solved.
The performance of Opala 3.8L was actually quite pleasing; with a top speed of 112.5 mph (181.1 km/h) and acceleration from 0 to 60 mph (97 km/h) in about 11 seconds, it was the fastest Brazilian car of its time, losing the title the following year to the Dodge Dart whose 318ci V8 had more power and torque. The two 2.5L fours did not offer as much vigor, but had enough torque enough for everyday use. The main complaint with the four-cylinder engines was their roughness - so rough that GM employees of the time called the engine "little Toyota", in allusion to the diesel engine installed in the locally built Toyota Bandeirante.
Both the Especial and Luxo had a manual gearbox, rear wheel drive, front independent suspension and rear live axle, both with coil springs. In front, the suspension components were anchored to one side, set in the unibody with screws, later known as the subframe. The tires were the first tubeless tires used on a car manufactured in Brazil. It had a diaphragmatic (or "Chinese hat") clutch spring, which was becoming popular throughout the world. The Opala SS, originally only available with the "250" engine, was the first version to receive a four-speed manual gearbox. This was coupled with a tachometer and lots of matte black striping.













Technical data:
- engine: 4 cylinders
- capacity: 2500 cc
- horsepower: 98 HP
- gearbox: 5+1
- top speed: 160 km/h

Chevrolet 3100 Pick Up

Friday 15 March 2019
Advance-Design was a pickup truck series by Chevrolet, their first major redesign after WWII. Its GMC counterpart was the GMC New Design. It was billed as a larger, stronger, and sleeker design in comparison to the earlier AK Series. First available on Saturday June 28, 1947, these trucks were sold with various minor changes over the years until March 25, 1955, when the Task Force Series trucks replaced the aging Advance-Design model.
The same basic design family was used for all of its trucks including the Suburban, panel trucks, canopy express and cab overs. The cab overs used the same basic cab configuration and similar grille but used a shorter and taller hood and different fenders. The unique Cab Over fenders and hood required a custom cowl area which makes the Cab Over Engine cabs and normal truck cabs incompatible with one another while all truck cabs of all weights interchange.
From 1947 until 1955, Chevrolet trucks were number one in sales in the United States, with rebranded versions sold at GMC locations.
While General Motors used this front end sheet metal, and to a slightly lesser extent the cab, on all of its trucks except for the Cab Overs, there are three main sizes of this truck: the half-, three-quarter-, and full ton capacities in short and long wheelbase.













The Chevrolet Task Force was Chevrolet's successor to the Advance Design trucks. The Task Force Series ran from late 1955 (second series) through 1959. At GMC locations, it was called the Blue Chip Series.
The 1955 second series offered standard options and add-ons such as 12-volt electrical systems, the first V8 (the 265 cubic inch), and fleet-side six-, seven-, and eight-foot length beds.











Technical data:
- engine: 6 cylinders
- capacity: 3900 cc
- horsepower: 125 HP
- gearbox: 3+1
- top speed: 100 km/h